The HarmsBoones

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We got married!

We’ve had this site, HarmsBoone.org, for about five years, now. It started as an easy place to direct our families (the Harms’ and the Boones) for updates on our lives in Korea, then Hungary, but on August 2 we became the HarmsBoones after an incredible wedding celebration on Minnesota’s North Shore. We had a fantastic time with the friends and family who made the trip up to Castle Danger to party with us, and now we’re back in DC resuming our normal lives.

Below are some pictures we managed to take from the wedding (and a couple from our photographer). There are more to be found, for sure, but we want to quickly shout out a few people in particular who were crucial to making this weekend happen:

  • First, to our families for all the support they gave us before and during the wedding. We are endlessly thankful to have such wonderful parents, aunts and uncles, cousins, second and third cousins…you get the idea, couldn’t have pulled this thing off without all your support
  • To our many friends who came from far and wide to join us, and who reminded us of what we already knew: that we are beyond fortunate to have such a great network of friends.
  • A HUGE thanks to Laura and Galen, who drove all the way from Denver to transport a box of beautiful but breakables sculptures and more than one box of delicious but breakable Emperial Brewing beer. More big thanks to Galen for brewing that beer and to Laura for officiating the wedding as the best wedding captain known to humanity. The weekend would have been less ceremonial and decorative and hoppy without their skills.
  • Our amazing wedding party who helped with logistical and emotional aspects of bride and groom management.
  • Our photographer John Sharpe: seriously, not enough words for all the good things we want to say about him.
  • Lake Superior for being awesome.
  • Franky and Annie Scaglione for working incredibly hard to design and create gorgeously whimsical sculptures of the places we’ve been for us to scatter around the reception hall. Check them out below and soon at My Favourite Colour Studio. Okay, now the pictures.

Some highlights:

From the window of our beach house we could see waves lapping up at the shore and occasional geese and other waterfowl that inhabit the lake's chilly waters.
From the window of our beach house we could see waves lapping up at the shore and occasional geese cruising the lake’s chilly waters.
Early August and the lake was icy cold. We dipped our toes in, but they didn't last long.
Early August and the lake was icy cold. We dipped our toes in, but they didn’t last long.
Danielle's cousin Meghann made this delicious Norwegian Kransekakes for the wedding, and managed to track down flags from all the places we visited over the last few years to decorate it.
Danielle’s cousin Meghann made this delicious Norwegian Kransekakes for the wedding, and managed to track down flags from all the places we visited over the last few years to decorate it.
Italy, SolidState Sculpture from My Favourite Colour Studio
Our awesome friends Franky and Annie at My Favourite Colour Studio in Denver, CO made some amazing sculptures for us to use in our centerpieces. This one is Italy. Oh, and see those stellar flower arrangements? Those are by the lovely ladies at Saffron and Grey, in Duluth.
Washington, DC: SolidState Sculptures by My Favourite Colour Studio
Washington, DC
Danielle and Greg: pre-ceremony
It’s us! Photo by our amazing photographer, John Sharpe.
Photo by John Sharpe
Danielle, looking stunning. Photo by John Sharpe. Flowers by Saffron and Grey.
Photo by John Sharpe
Greg: post-wedding
Sunrise over Lake Superior at Castle Danger
The sunrise as seen from our beach house the morning after the wedding.
It's not really a book, but a map! All of our guests traveled to be with us. The shortest travel time was probably around 3 hours and the longest trips included guests who flew from every corner of the country and who drove from Idaho and Colorado to be with us. We are truly lucky to have so many wonderful friends and family who headed up north for the weekend.
It’s not really a book, but a map! All of our guests traveled to be with us. The shortest travel time was probably around 3 hours and the longest trips included guests who flew from every corner of the country and who drove from Idaho and Colorado to be with us. We are truly lucky to have so many wonderful friends and family who headed up north for the weekend.

The 2013 Chuncheon Makguksu and Dakgalbi Festival

Each year in August the small city of Chuncheon, about an hour by express commuter rail from Seoul, hosts a week-long festival celebrating two specific Korean dishes: makguksu and dakgalbi. Apparently this year the town decided that late June was a more suitable time for the festival this year, and thank goodness because we’re really glad we got to go.

Dakgalbi, a casserole made from chicken ribs, rice cakes, red pepper paste, cabbage, and a few other things depending on where you’re eating it, was one of the first Korean dishes we ever had and easily among our top favorites. It’s prepared on a giant skillet in the middle of the table and shared among everyone present. We had been craving it since the moment we got off the airplane.

Makguksu was new, at least we’re pretty sure we had never had it before. It reminded us of bibimguksu, except with buckwheat noodles and possibly a different kind of broth. It’s a chilled noodle soup with a radish, anchovy, or beef broth. I think we had the radish variety. Apart from the noodles, the soup was a lot of different vegetables, some kimchi, and red pepper paste.

Picking a place to eat makguksu was not hard, though it definitely could have been. The festival took place in a large field directly outside the train station that we understand was once a military camp. The food tents formed a outer wall for the festival, with banners above them alternating blue and red, for the soup and the chicken, respectively. Despite what must have been two dozen possible choices, we were so hungry we sat down at the first one we came across.

After eating we walked around the festival, but eventually the heat became too much to bear, and with a surprising lack of shade, we reluctantly headed to a cafe for iced drinks to plan the rest of our day. We wanted to see some of the amazing lakes and streams that Chuncheon is famous for but didn’t have the will to jump in a cab, so we headed to Gongjicheon, a small stream running between the lakes nestled into Chuncheon’s mountains. It always struck us as amazing how well Koreans do the outdoors. Gongjicheon, like so many other parks and wilderness areas was beautiful, with well maintained walking, running, and biking paths (this park had at least 12k of track along its rivers and lakes). We ended up having a our dakgalbi not at the festival, but at a little shop along the stream. It might have been the best dakgalbi we’ve ever had. The chicken was excellent, and the vegetable combinations were perfect. I guess that’s what happens when you get it from the source.

You’re Back? Retuning to Seoul, three years later.

It was about three years ago that we said good bye to the Land of the Morning Calm, a sad day I think both of us will remember for many years to come. For all the struggles of living and breathing Korea for that year, it was a place that we came to love more than any other place outside our own homes. When it came time to return this week, we found ourselves at a loss for all the things we wanted to do. There was so much we never experienced while we were here, and even more that we wanted to relive, but where to start? We decided on Ilsan. Continue reading “You’re Back? Retuning to Seoul, three years later.”

Sunset on Twin Oaks Farm

Sunset on Twin Oaks Farm
Tucking the baby chicks in to their coops for the night. Actually, the coop on the left is currently empty, but in just a few days a new generation of baby chicks will arrive and set up shop.

I first arrived at Twin Oaks Farm three years ago, on an evening long after the sun had set. I checked my directions for the dozenth time and confirmed that they did indeed say to turn off the well lit highway when I saw the pitch black playground, down the unpaved gravel road lined on each side by trees, and onto the first driveway on the right. “It’s a long driveway, so you won’t be able to see the house from the road,” the directions warned. As I flicked on my brights and turned down the unpaved street, my travel buddy and friend, Alison, showed the same raised-eye-brows skepticism I felt. This was beginning to feel like the plot of a horror movie: naive college girls want to play farmer and are never heard from again. Continue reading “Sunset on Twin Oaks Farm”

Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs in Apples. CC Entertailion, flickr

Steve Jobs was a great man who invented some amazing devices that have changed the way we interact with technology. Today we’ve changed our look, (inspired by boingboing.net) to a retro mac theme in his memory. I never knew Jobs, and never thought I’d get the chance, but he was an inspiring public speaker, an innovator, and a businessman not afraid to make insanely great products. His genius, his commitment to greatness, near perfection and thinking different, left a mark on global technology and industrial design that will far outlast his mortality.

Thanks, Steve. Rest in Peace.

Stay Hungry.