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Category: Features

Longer stories, usually around 1,000+ words

A Quick (Belated) Podcast

It’s been a while since our last post here at Keeping up with the Magyars, but among working, applying for graduate school, and enjoying this splendid country, we have not had a lot of time for updating the blog.

So here it is, a collection of audio sampled from across about two months covering the first day of school, a community celebration, and the 54th Anniverssary of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution. Enjoy the audio, and stay tuned here for future entries about dinner parties, education in Hungary, and our upcoming week in Slovenia.

Listen:
Download:https://harmsboone.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/sites/4/sites/4/sites/4/2010/10/introducing_hungary.mp3

Trabbis and Transitions: First impressions of Hungary

Part 1 of 2: Read part two at https://harmsboone.org/more-first-impressions.

Prior to my arrival in Hungary about a month ago the only Trabant I had seen was on display at Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin amidst the plethora of East German communism memorabilia. The Trabant, or Trabbi as they were affectionately known, was the only and official automobile of East Germany. The fabled vehicle survives, for most, only through the myths and legends that precede the brand that fell with the Berlin Wall. Continue reading “Trabbis and Transitions: First impressions of Hungary”

Welcome

Welcome to “Keeping up with the Magyars”, a new blog from Harms-Boone Productions. This blog is our venue for telling the stories of our lives as English teachers in Kaposvár, Hungary, as well as analysis and commentary on the issues of the day. If you are familiar with our work, you know that we tell well-written, thoughtful stories about the places as we experience them, not as they experience us. Our commitment is to exchanging information openly through the Internet. It is for this reason we donate all of our work to either the open source community or to the creative commons. Unless otherwise noted, our content is free for you to use, distribute, and repurpose as you see fit as long as you are not using it commercially and give us a little credit. We strive to update weekly, but to be sure you aren’t missing any of our posts, be sure to click the subscribe link above and sign up for our feeds or for our email list. Continue reading “Welcome”

Dispatch from the Classroom: First Grade

Don’t Pick the Flowers

“Don’t pick flowers,” was the immediate response when my first grade students were asked recently to imagine that our class had been whisked away from our room in Ilsan, South Korea and plopped down on an isolated island with the challenge of governing ourselves. “Don’t pick flowers,” was among the first must-have laws. Our white board was soon overflowing with edicts like, “Don’t catch whales or animals, except cows,” “Pick a president, then be nice to them,” and “Love the nature.” How simple it is to bring law and order to a society. Others included:

  • Don’t pollute nature or the sea.
  • Stay away from strangers.
  • Don’t go to dangerous places.
  • Don’t go too far from the group.
  • Don’t say bad words.
  • Don’t kill animals. Eat rice, fruit, or vegetables.
  • Eat what is good for your body.
  • Behave.
  • Always be happy and work hard for the country.
  • Always try your best.
  • Stick together.
  • Don’t use too much water.
  • Every child should go to school for free.
  • Be nice to others.
  • Don’t go to the deep sea. Continue reading “Dispatch from the Classroom: First Grade”

Snow Day in Ilsan

It was a sunny and snowy day in Ilsan on Monday.

After a week spent in the crunchy snow and shiver-inducing temperatures of the Midwest, my winter boots got plenty of use. When it came to packing them for my trip back to Goyang, South Korea, I nearly left them behind, thinking of the snowless streets I had left behind only days earlier. Over-packer that I am, I jammed them in my suitcase just to be safe, and by Monday, I was glad to have them. Christmas day brought a light dusting of snow, leaving about 2 inches of packed powder to derail my rolling suitcase on the sidewalks, but little more than that. As I woke up, jet-lagged and groggy, on Monday, I looked out the window and thought, “Is it snowing?” And snowing it was. A lot. And the flakes didn’t just make an appearance in the morning, but consistently fell in a white flurry all throughout the day. Continue reading “Snow Day in Ilsan”